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January 29th, 2016 | by BTC News
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Image from page 335 of “Machinery for metalliferous mines : a practical treatise for mining engineers, metallurgists and managers of mines” (1902)
mining pool
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Identifier: machineryformeta00davi
Title: Machinery for metalliferous mines : a practical treatise for mining engineers, metallurgists and managers of mines
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Davies, E. Henry (Edward Henry)
Subjects: Mining machinery
Publisher: London : Crosby Lockwood New York : Van Nostrand
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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ains to a seriesof rising and falling—or pulsating—movements. The limits of sizebetween which a mineral can be profitably jigged are from i| in. down-wards to T~ in. If the ore is coarser than this it requires too muchpower, and if finer the action of its specific gravity is lessened by friction,and the material lies too close together, so that other means must beadopted for its separation. The earliest attempts to utilise the difference in the specific gravitiesof the ore and its gangue was by hand jigging, as shown in the sketch(fig. 196). It is said to have been practised in Bohemia as early as 1519.The sieve is an ordinary one, having a perforated metal or wire netting 291 292 MACHINERY FOR METALLIFEROUS MINES. bottom; the mixed minerals were thrown into this, and were shaken andjerked up and down in a tub or pool of water, until the lead took thelowest, the blende the middle, and the sand and gravel the uppermostplaces. These were then removed in layers by means of a scraper.

Text Appearing After Image:
\ \ \ \ X- . Fig. 197.—Primitive Jigging Machine. After this the sieve was attached to a frame, as shown in fig. 197, andmoved up and down in a cistern or hutch by means of a system of levers.The machine, which is still in use in some parts, is worked by a woman

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 214 of “Bulletin” (1910)
mining pool
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Identifier: bulletin195unit
Title: Bulletin
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: United States. Bureau of Mines
Subjects: Mines and mineral resources Mines and mineral resources Mining engineering
Publisher: Washington U.S. Govt. Print. Off. [etc.]
Contributing Library: Gerstein – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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UNDERGROUND LOSSES. 163 about Novpnihor, 191S, and has boon blowinjx wild ever since. A crater \vastlion imniediatoly formed and a number of otlier gas blowouts occurred allaround this well for a distance of about 800 feet. It is said that the rockpressure on the surrounding wells was reduced perceptibly after this wellhad been blowing for some time. At the time we were there (March, 1919)tlu-re wore a number of very shallow pools of water standing all around intlu neighborhood and numerous bubbles of gas were visible over very largeareas. , LOSSES DUE TO PERFORATING ALL SANDS. If gas will migrate laterally 800 feet as described above and forceits way vertically through several hundred feet of formation, someidea may be gained as to the harm that will result from exposing

Text Appearing After Image:
Fir.fnE 29.—Sketch showing entrance of water into oil sand and its migration to aproperly drilled well, from the use of only one string of casing in first well. AfterBull. 82, California State Mining Bureau, p. 1.3. oil and gas to porous formations underground. In California, par-ticularly, the tendenc}^ is for the operators to perforate oppositeseveral sands, although they are not certain that all of them are oiland gas bearing. Much oil and gas is under enormous rock pres-sure, and undoubtedly the perforation of all sands causes a largeunderground waste. This condition is brought out in Plate XXI. LOSSES CAUSED BY NOT KNOWING PRODUCING ZONE. Tremendous losses may be caused by the operators failing torealize the exact horizon that affords production. Often carefulstudy by the petroleum engineer will show the depth at which awell would be expected to encounter the producing zone, and theforeman Avould thus be prepared to handle the well in a proper 164 UNDERGROUND CONDITIONS IN OIL

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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